With Speaker Pelosi Calling Congress Back to Washington, American Workers, Small Businesses, and Students Must Be the Highest Priority | American Center for Law and Justice

Workers and Students Must Be the Highest Priority of Congress

By Nathanael Bennett1597698955139

As we previously warned, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi seems determined to use the COVID-19 pandemic to accomplish her long list of radical Left policy priorities. Most recently, the Speaker decided to recess for the month of August rather than continue negotiations with the President and U.S. Senate on another round of pandemic assistance. She did so because the U.S. Senate preferred a narrower, more targeted assistance package over her $3 trillion bill loaded with unrelated measures. With millions of Americans facing the consequences of a multi-month pandemic, Speaker Pelosi decided it was more important to insist on her wish list than it was to deliver for the American People.

But speaking of delivering, she is now—just a few days later—calling the U.S. House back to Washington to address her latest pressing priority—a bailout for the United States Postal Service (USPS). You read that correctly—the U.S. House is returning to Washington, but not to negotiate on relief for the American People. Instead, the House will attempt to pass a massive $25 billion bailout of the USPS.

This bailout is a pretty transparent step toward Speaker Pelosi’s long-desired federal takeover of elections. Her vision, which she articulated by calling the USPS “Election Central,” is a country with mandated universal mail-in voting. This would, of course, strip states and localities of their constitutionally granted authority to oversee elections and would undermine an absolutely critical check-and-balance that helps ensure election integrity.

Keep in mind, every state already permits voters to request an absentee ballot, and 34 states and Washington, D.C., allow no-excuse absentee balloting. This drive toward universal mail-in balloting has never been about whether mail-in ballots will play a role in elections—they long have. Instead, it is about whether the federal government will be allowed to supplant the states as the primary election authority. On this fundamental question, the answer should be unequivocally no.

Moreover, as elected officials in Washington, D.C., debate how to provide relief to Americans struggling as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is absolutely critical that American workers, small businesses, and students not be snubbed in favor of a bailout for the USPS. Of course, a bipartisan negotiation may result in some additional federal assistance for the USPS—President Trump openly said as much—but this should not occur at the expense of American families still struggling to balance the pressure of forced business closures, working from home, and schools that remain closed.

As Congress negotiates how to further respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the priorities must be: 1) targeted assistance for the American people, 2) a replenishing of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) for small businesses that have been forced to close, and 3) flexible assistance for parents of students who no longer have a school to attend (as we at the ACLJ have repeatedly advocated). Given its likely increased role in this year’s election, it may also be appropriate to provide proportional funding for the USPS. This should not, however, occur if the aforementioned highest priorities are not met.

It is clear the USPS is in need of meaningful reform, and Congress should commit to engaging that debate in a serious and expeditious manner. The typical Washington, D.C., instinct to simply throw money at the problem will not solve the underlying problems with the USPS. The American people who depend on the USPS deserve a meaningful debate on substantive reforms, and Congress should engage that debate in good faith.

In summary, while the USPS may need some federal assistance, it must not be prioritized ahead of American workers, small businesses, and students.

Our Government Affairs team is mobilizing to deliver that exact message to Capitol Hill—No more funding for the USPS until Congress agrees on a deal that includes funding for the American people, American small businesses, and American students.

To add your voice to ours, sign our petition here.

Stop Speaker Pelosi’s Mail-In Political Plot

Radical Left  Signatures

LOGIN

Receive the latest news, updates, and contribution opportunities from ACLJ.

$20
$40
$60
$120
$240
Make this a monthly Tax-Deductible gift.

As we battle to stop the radical Left’s attempts to use a pandemic to force its extreme agenda, we urgently need your support. Have your gift DOUBLED now. Have your gift doubled through our Matching Challenge.

Email Address is required.
First Name is required.
Last Name is required.
Credit Card Number is required.
Verification Code is required.
Expiration Month is required.
Expiration Year is required.
Receive the latest news, updates, and contribution opportunities from the ACLJ.
Encourage your friends to sign and donate by sharing this petition.
Latest in
Radical Left

Mainstream Media Sells Hatred of America on Independence Day Weekend

By Jordan Sekulow1625604148774

As Americans all around the country celebrated Independence Day with friends and family this past weekend, the mainstream media used it as an opportunity to spread hate for America. Massive news outlets as well as sitting Members of Congress went public with their negative view of America, the...

read more

The Left Unleashes a Rallying Cry After Supreme Court Decisions

By Jordan Sekulow1625257565402

We told you yesterday that two major victories were issued by the Supreme Court that upheld crucial voting law in Arizona and struck down California’s attempt to target conservative organizations, chilling their members’ free speech on important issues. President Biden was “deeply disappointed” in...

read more

Rep. Omar Says She Doesn’t Regret Antisemitic Statements

By Jordan Sekulow1625088674381

We’ve told you how Representative Ilhan Omar already compared the United States and Israel to known terrorist organizations Hamas and the Taliban. This wasn’t the first time her offensive rhetoric has been brought to light. Rep. Omar is a repeat offender when it comes to making biased and...

read more

President Biden Projects Weakness Ahead of Putin Summit

By Jordan Sekulow1623705651568

As President Biden is wrapping up his first overseas trip as President of the United States, he is portraying himself and the United States as weak. One of the outcomes from the summit has been to let China get a free pass for the leading theory that COVID-19 was leaked out of a lab in Wuhan,

read more

American Center for Law and Justice | Washington D.C. | Copyright © 2021, ACLJ | Privacy & Security Policy | Annual Report

The ACLJ is an organization dedicated to the defense of constitutional liberties secured by law.

Visit ACLJ.org/help to submit a legal help request. All legal requests submitted via any other method cannot be answered.

Through our $1 Million Matching Challenge, all gifts will be doubled, dollar-for-dollar, up to the online daily total.

American Center for Law and Justice is a d/b/a for Christian Advocates Serving Evangelism, Inc., a tax-exempt, not-for-profit, religious corporation as defined under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, specifically dedicated to the ideal that religious freedom and freedom of speech are inalienable, God-given rights. The Center's purpose is to engage legal, legislative and cultural issues by implementing an effective strategy of advocacy, education and litigation to ensure that those rights are protected under the law. The organization has participated in numerous cases before the Supreme Court, Federal Court of Appeals, Federal District Courts, and various state courts regarding freedom of religion and freedom of speech. Your gift is very much appreciated and fully deductible as a charitable contribution. A copy of our latest financial report may be obtained by writing to us at P.O. Box 90555, Washington, DC 20090-0555.