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Over $50,000 a Year in ObamaCare Premiums for a Family?

By 

Matthew Clark

|

October 21, 2013

1 min read

ObamaCare

ObamaCare’s rollout has been a disaster.  For most trying to enroll, the website crashed.  For many who did enroll, their information was mangled.  Insurance companies are reporting receiving the wrong data on enrollees.

So over the weekend, Healthcare.gov got an overhaul.  Not to how you enroll to fix the bugs.  Not to keep your data secure or to ensure enrollees’ data gets to the insurance company.  But to the homepage.

That’s right ObamaCare got a facelift.  So I went to healthcare.gov to see one of the new features.  What I found was disturbing. 

One of the changes was to allow anyone to see plans available in your area without having to give your personal information to the government.  See one of the biggest problems of the last few weeks was that after your personal information was received by the government the website crashed.  So the government got your information, but you didn’t get health insurance.

Here’s what I found when I tried this new feature.  I entered in my city, state and number of people in my family to see what health plans are available to me and my family.

First, I decided to look at the low-tier, catastrophic coverage, under ObamaCare.  This should typically be the cheapest plan per month.  Yet one option would have cost my family over $50,000 a year in premiums.

My first thought was maybe this was just a mistake, another technical “glitch” in the website.  So I kept looking.

Here are a few more of the plans I found, costing as much a $4,910 a MONTH in premiums.  That’s nearly $58,920 a year for a family of five.

That’s what a train wreck looks like.  The American people clearly can’t afford ObamaCare.  And ObamaCare clearly isn’t ready for America.

Sign the petition to hold those responsible for this utter failure accountable.

This article is crossposted on Red State.

Matthew Clark

More Articles

Matthew Clark is Senior Counsel for Digital Advocacy with the ACLJ in the Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Matthew Clark

Matthew Clark is Senior Counsel for Digital Advocacy with the ACLJ in the Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Over $50,000 a Year in ObamaCare Premiums for a Family?

By 

Matthew Clark

|

October 21, 2013

1 min read

ObamaCare

ObamaCare’s rollout has been a disaster.  For most trying to enroll, the website crashed.  For many who did enroll, their information was mangled.  Insurance companies are reporting receiving the wrong data on enrollees.

So over the weekend, Healthcare.gov got an overhaul.  Not to how you enroll to fix the bugs.  Not to keep your data secure or to ensure enrollees’ data gets to the insurance company.  But to the homepage.

That’s right ObamaCare got a facelift.  So I went to healthcare.gov to see one of the new features.  What I found was disturbing. 

One of the changes was to allow anyone to see plans available in your area without having to give your personal information to the government.  See one of the biggest problems of the last few weeks was that after your personal information was received by the government the website crashed.  So the government got your information, but you didn’t get health insurance.

Here’s what I found when I tried this new feature.  I entered in my city, state and number of people in my family to see what health plans are available to me and my family.

First, I decided to look at the low-tier, catastrophic coverage, under ObamaCare.  This should typically be the cheapest plan per month.  Yet one option would have cost my family over $50,000 a year in premiums.

My first thought was maybe this was just a mistake, another technical “glitch” in the website.  So I kept looking.

Here are a few more of the plans I found, costing as much a $4,910 a MONTH in premiums.  That’s nearly $58,920 a year for a family of five.

That’s what a train wreck looks like.  The American people clearly can’t afford ObamaCare.  And ObamaCare clearly isn’t ready for America.

Sign the petition to hold those responsible for this utter failure accountable.

This article is crossposted on Red State.

Matthew Clark

More Articles

Matthew Clark is Senior Counsel for Digital Advocacy with the ACLJ in the Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Matthew Clark

Matthew Clark is Senior Counsel for Digital Advocacy with the ACLJ in the Washington, D.C. headquarters.

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