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By ACLJ.org1321464524000

With the Supreme Court poised to hear oral arguments (5+ hours) in March, it comes as no suprise that there are renewed calls to put cameras in the courtroom - to televise the arguments concerning the constitutionality of ObamaCare.

The request comes from C-SPAN in a letter to Chief Justice John Roberts. "We believe the public interest is best served by live television coverage of this particular oral argument," the letter stated. "It is a case which affects every American’s life, our economy, and will certainly be an issue in the upcoming presidential campaign." C-SPAN promised to work with the Court "to ensure to your satisfaction that our video equipment is unobtrusive and respectful of the process."

The high court has never permitted its proceedings to be televised, even on a delayed basis.

In recent years, the high court has permitted the same-day release of audio recordings of certain arguments in high-profile cases, but that practice ended in September 2010. The Court now makes audiotapes of oral arguments available to the public at the end of each argument week. The recordings are posted to the Supreme Court's website on Fridays of that week.

We will let you know if the Court responds to C-SPAN's request.

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