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By Jay Sekulow1316199584000

If you watched any of the 9/11 coverage from Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and the field in Pennsylvania, you know that this was a solemn day - a day to remember - a day to grieve - and a day to pray.

Despite New York City Mayor Bloomberg's stubborn refusal to acknowledge the importance of including prayer at the official event at Ground Zero, the fact is that prayer and Scripture played an integral part of this solemn and sacred remembrance - and for that we are grateful. As you know, nearly 40,000 Americans stood with us in signing a letter to Mayor Bloomberg supporting prayer and urging him to reverse his ban on prayer permitting religious leaders to take part.

He did not rescind his ban, but that did not stop prayer for taking place. In his remarks at Ground Zero, President Obama read Psalm 46

Former President George W. Bush, who presided over the U.S. reaction to the 9/11 attacks, read from a letter written by Abraham Lincoln in 1864 to a mother who lost five sons during the Civil War. Lincoln ended the letter saying, "I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom." 

And former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani read from Ecclesiastes.

President Obama, former President Bush, and former Mayor Giuliani - understood the importance of including prayer in their remarks - prayer for those who are still suffering from the nation's worst terrorist attack - prayer for our nation. Too bad Mayor Bloomberg didn't get it.

Prayer Reaffirmed at the Supreme Court

By Matthew Clark1399313940000

In a landmark decision today, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that prayer before legislative meetings is constitutional. In debunking one of the greatest myths in Establishment Clause jurisprudence, the Court held that not only is opening such meetings in prayer constitutional, it is not limited to...

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A Nation’s History of Prayer

By Nathanael Bennett1398949217000

Today, May 1, 2014, is the 63rd annual National Day of Prayer. However, our nation’s dependence on prayer reaches all the way back to our founding. Our first President, George Washington, officially called the nation to prayer and Thanksgiving in 1789, and even before that, our first Congress...

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Power of the Offended Atheist

By Walter M. Weber1392670357000

The Supreme Court is currently pondering the case of Town of Greece v. Galloway . In that case, two women – one Jewish, the other atheist – have brought a constitutional challenge to a New York town’s practice of opening town board meetings with a prayer. The prayer is delivered by rotating guest...

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Assault on Public Prayer at Supreme Court

By Walter M. Weber1379697376000

The battle over prayer in public life has once again made its way to the nation’s highest court, in an important Supreme Court case about the constitutionality of having invocations at the start of government meetings. Opponents of public prayer seek to ban such invocations. The ACLJ has joined the...

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